An experiment combining collage, print, and charcoal and chalks influenced by the Artists I’ve looked at recently. The printed figure is one twin and the collaged image on top of that is the other twin.
By thinking of three words that encompass my project: ‘identity’, ‘combination’, and ‘reconstruction’, it creates a focus for my work so any experiment I do is to investigate those three words. By placing two twins faces together I begin to question their identity; who is who? Which one is which? It’s interesting to blur their identities into one. Combining their faces enables a closer examination into their similarities and differences, maybe bringing out the dominant features of each twin or just highlighting their resemblance? Finally, ultimately what I’m doing is reconstructing two twins’ faces into one, resulting in the ‘other’ being: a combination of both twins. 
Here the shape of the collaged image is quite interesting to look at and fits onto the printed image quite nicely. I think if the ink was applied a little heavier it would be more effective of a contrast between the light and dark, I also need to remember not to draw the features directly but to use tone and draw around them to bring them out. A face-on image would also provide more to compare each twin. 

An experiment combining collage, print, and charcoal and chalks influenced by the Artists I’ve looked at recently. The printed figure is one twin and the collaged image on top of that is the other twin.

By thinking of three words that encompass my project: ‘identity’, ‘combination’, and ‘reconstruction’, it creates a focus for my work so any experiment I do is to investigate those three words. By placing two twins faces together I begin to question their identity; who is who? Which one is which? It’s interesting to blur their identities into one. Combining their faces enables a closer examination into their similarities and differences, maybe bringing out the dominant features of each twin or just highlighting their resemblance? Finally, ultimately what I’m doing is reconstructing two twins’ faces into one, resulting in the ‘other’ being: a combination of both twins. 

Here the shape of the collaged image is quite interesting to look at and fits onto the printed image quite nicely. I think if the ink was applied a little heavier it would be more effective of a contrast between the light and dark, I also need to remember not to draw the features directly but to use tone and draw around them to bring them out. A face-on image would also provide more to compare each twin. 

Progressing from looking at Richard Hamilton’s use of printing and collage, and Hannah Höch’s use of collage I’ve moved on to looking at Frank Auerbach and technique of building up his paintings. Auerbach achieves a textured piece by using layers and layers of oil paints on top of each other, repeatedly painting the first image onto the same canvas, gradually building the painting up. By starting with a printed image achieved by rolling black ink onto Perspex and then taking away from the ink to create a figure, I end up with a textured looking piece without any texture. Then, by working into the print with chalk, charcoal, and pencils repeatedly I too build up the image gradually making it look more textured and full.

Just a few of my experiments using printing, applying a layer of black ink and then taking away from that to draw out a figure instead of drawing onto the perspex directly with the ink. I feel that this is a more interesting way of getting a base layer of the figure.

Before trying do it with printing, I experimented with an eraser drawing by covering the paper in charcoal and then using an eraser to take out bits of light and draw out a figure. The second time I did the same thing with the eraser but then used pencil and graphite to draw back into the image. I think the method is not to draw the object directly but to use tone and draw around the object to bring it out, which is why I think the first attempt was more successful.

Using a base layer of a print, instead of using coloured acrylics I’ve used pencil to draw back into the picture and bring out the face more. While not achieving the same idea that I wanted to convey, as the image stuck onto the print is of the same face, this works better than what I was doing previously. Simply using ink to draw in the face is less interesting than maybe preparing a black screen and then taking away from that, looking at areas of light and dark. I also think the collaged image would sit better on the print if it was in black and white.

Using a base layer of a print, instead of using coloured acrylics I’ve used pencil to draw back into the picture and bring out the face more. While not achieving the same idea that I wanted to convey, as the image stuck onto the print is of the same face, this works better than what I was doing previously. Simply using ink to draw in the face is less interesting than maybe preparing a black screen and then taking away from that, looking at areas of light and dark. I also think the collaged image would sit better on the print if it was in black and white.

Here I started with a base layer print of a face with one half of the face being mine and the other half being Marcus’s. I then painted onto that using acrylics and then collaged over that putting Marcus’s image onto his side of the face and my image onto my side of the face. I think it looks quite interesting and alien but also rather messy, I’m not too sure about using colour.

Here I started with a base layer print of a face with one half of the face being mine and the other half being Marcus’s. I then painted onto that using acrylics and then collaged over that putting Marcus’s image onto his side of the face and my image onto my side of the face. I think it looks quite interesting and alien but also rather messy, I’m not too sure about using colour.

After looking at Höch I experimented with photoshop again using Tamsin and Sophie to try and do some more different and interesting collages with varying levels of success.

I later did a more related collage in my sketchbook observing the composition of Höch’s ‘Indian Dancer: From an Ethnographic Museum’ which turned out quite well. I tried to do more experiments staying closer to Höch but I felt that I needed another medium in my project.

Indian Dancer: From an Ethnographic MuseumHannah Höch1930

I looked at Hannah Höch and her use of collage; combining two different things: women and manmade objects, as a comment on the beauty industry. By combining two twins together and reconstructing them to form one face I too make a comment, not on the beauty industry but on identity and the idea that these two people were originally from one and maybe create that ‘original’. This also may be a comment on behaviour towards twins, like continuously getting them mixed up and mistaking one for the other showing how different (or similar) they are. 

Indian Dancer: From an Ethnographic Museum
Hannah Höch
1930

I looked at Hannah Höch and her use of collage; combining two different things: women and manmade objects, as a comment on the beauty industry. By combining two twins together and reconstructing them to form one face I too make a comment, not on the beauty industry but on identity and the idea that these two people were originally from one and maybe create that ‘original’. This also may be a comment on behaviour towards twins, like continuously getting them mixed up and mistaking one for the other showing how different (or similar) they are.